The Art of Shibori (part two)

— Missed part one? You’ll find it here! —

After Meg’s demonstarations in the shed, we headed back up into the warmth (courtesy of the aforementioned adorable potbelly wood heater) to start stitching, tying and folding our own shibori creations — and LUNCH.

As well as being an amazing architect and stylist, it turns out Natasha also harbours an incredible talent for cooking. I had a bit of inkling thanks to that delicious morning tea orange and almond cake — which I still have yet to attempt myself — but holy cow; as the food was brought up to the studio I think my eyes were getting wider and wider by the second.

Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori

It was a true feast fit for a cozy winter’s day in the woods!

Poached pears with currants, a salad of kale and pine nuts (most delicious kale I’ve ever eaten. Not even a hint of bitterness), roasted root vegetables with black pearl barley and pomegranate molasses, and slow cooked pork shoulder (falling off the bone, hnng).

Dessert was pears poached in mulled wine, topped with a dollop of cream. Absolute heaven.

Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori

Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori

Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori

Once our tummies were full and our stitching was done, it was back down to the garden shed to do some dyeing! Natasha had some homemade mulled wine waiting for us on the stove, and we huddled around in our cozy blankets, clutching our mugs and watching Meg’s finished pieces come out (looking magnificent of course).

Between sips of wine, we took turns dyeing our own shibori pieces and timing our dips. The process was so much fun and watching the dye change colour was just incredible to watch. I don’t think we even noticed the cold!

Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori

Fiddle & Spoon | ShiboriFiddle & Spoon | Shibori

Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori

Fiddle & Spoon | ShiboriFiddle & Spoon | Shibori

Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori

Fiddle & Spoon | ShiboriFiddle & Spoon | Shibori

Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori
Fiddle & Spoon | Shibori

By the end of the day we each had a pile of our own shibori creations, including a gorgeous silk scarf that I’ve since worn at least eighty times. It was such a beautiful day full of so many incredible things! I had such a blast meeting some pretty fabulous people and learning a new skill (and eating delicious things, and drooling over a house). What could be better?

Thank you so much to Meg and Natasha for having me — I’m sure I’m not alone in my newfound love of shibori ;)!

Be sure to check out Meg’s website and follow her on instagram. If you’re interested in purchasing any of Meg’s work, you’ll find them available through Craft Victoria, Tarrawarra Museum of Art and Manteau Noir.

You also better have a look at Natasha’s website to find out more about Oak and Monkey Puzzle, and keep up to date on future workshops by following her Instagram too!

LEAVE A COMMENT

RELATED POSTS